Regardless of how you feel about it, virtual immortality is totally a thing and now, thanks to Israeli Yoav Medan who had a QR code etched onto his mothers tombstone, it may become an increasingly mobile  thing. The code itself isn’t a sticker or plaque or any kind of affixed  image, but rather is laser etched into the stone of the tombstone, the  white bits remaining raised, the black bits being etched in as  indentations. Apply some thick, black paste and boom, you’ve got  yourself a decidedly neolithic QR code that is erosion resistant. Bet  you never expected to see that noun-adjective pair. The code directs  users to a website Yoav has dedicated to his mother’s memory, a site  which he plans to expand in the future.

Regardless of how you feel about it, virtual immortality is totally a thing and now, thanks to Israeli Yoav Medan who had a QR code etched onto his mothers tombstone, it may become an increasingly mobile thing. The code itself isn’t a sticker or plaque or any kind of affixed image, but rather is laser etched into the stone of the tombstone, the white bits remaining raised, the black bits being etched in as indentations. Apply some thick, black paste and boom, you’ve got yourself a decidedly neolithic QR code that is erosion resistant. Bet you never expected to see that noun-adjective pair. The code directs users to a website Yoav has dedicated to his mother’s memory, a site which he plans to expand in the future.


Regardless of how you feel about it, virtual immortality is totally a thing and now, thanks to Israeli Yoav Medan who had a QR code etched onto his mothers tombstone, it may become an increasingly mobile  thing. The code itself isn’t a sticker or plaque or any kind of affixed  image, but rather is laser etched into the stone of the tombstone, the  white bits remaining raised, the black bits being etched in as  indentations. Apply some thick, black paste and boom, you’ve got  yourself a decidedly neolithic QR code that is erosion resistant. Bet  you never expected to see that noun-adjective pair. The code directs  users to a website Yoav has dedicated to his mother’s memory, a site  which he plans to expand in the future.

Regardless of how you feel about it, virtual immortality is totally a thing and now, thanks to Israeli Yoav Medan who had a QR code etched onto his mothers tombstone, it may become an increasingly mobile thing. The code itself isn’t a sticker or plaque or any kind of affixed image, but rather is laser etched into the stone of the tombstone, the white bits remaining raised, the black bits being etched in as indentations. Apply some thick, black paste and boom, you’ve got yourself a decidedly neolithic QR code that is erosion resistant. Bet you never expected to see that noun-adjective pair. The code directs users to a website Yoav has dedicated to his mother’s memory, a site which he plans to expand in the future.

Posted 2 years ago & Filed under ccommunication, 11 notes

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  1. fiveminutesintothefuture posted this

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The Five Minutes Into the Future theme song, written and performed by The Ultramods. Created entirely on the iPad using GarageBand, with sounds sampled from The Ultramod's air conditioner.

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